Apparent Power Converter

Apparent Power Converter Online

Apparent Power is the Total Power Flowing

When electrical energy is applied to a load (such as a computer, motor, lights, or cooling system), part of the energy is not used to carry out beneficial work but is instead reflected back to the power source (the electrical company). There are two methods to calculate the total power entering a motor: measuring the voltage and current separately, and measuring the voltage and current multiplied together. For example, if you measured 208 volts and 5 amps, the apparent power would be 1040VA.

In an electrical circuit, voltage and current result in apparent power, which is the vector sum of actual and reactive power.

Active Power Definition: True power, active power, or real power are all terms used to describe the actual power utilized in an AC circuit. It is expressed in kW or megawatts (MW). The electrical system's real output is what drives the electric circuits or load.

Reactive power is defined as the power that flows back and forth, or that goes in both directions in a circuit or reacts against itself. Kilovolt-ampere reactive (kVAR) or megavolt-ampere reactive (MVAR) units are used to quantify reactive power.

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RMS current times RMS voltage equals apparent power, which is a measurement of AC electrical power. Voltage and current are in phase in DC circuits and in pure resistance (no impedance) AC circuits. The following equation is valid if the two are equal:


P = ErmsIrms

where P is the power expressed in watts, Erms is the root-mean-square (RMS) voltage expressed in volts, and Irms is the RMS current expressed in amperes. Voltage and current are not always in phase in an AC circuit. Determining power gets more difficult the more you practice.

A common term for perceived power in an AC circuit is the sum of the RMS voltage and RMS current. The perceived power is because an impedance of one megohm is equivalent to a resistance of one volt for every amp. We say the resistance is more than the genuine power when the true power is less than the apparent power. Reactive power is the vector difference between perceived and real power.

A common term for perceived power in an AC circuit is the sum of the RMS voltage and RMS current. The perceived power and the actual power are the same when the impedance is pure resistance. However, when reactance is present, the perceived power exceeds the actual power. Reactive power is the vector difference between perceived and real power.

The following equation is true if Pa represents the apparent power in a complex AC circuit, Pt represents the real energy, and Pr represents the reactive power:

Pa = Pt2 + Pr2 

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